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ITEC 4335 -- Database Development and Administration

Updated March 22, 2012

Office and Addresses

Delta 171 Phone 281.283.3805
email: boetticher@uhcl.edu
Secretary: Ms. Kim Edwards, Delta 161 281.283.3860

Face-to-Face Class Hours

Thursday 7:00 - 9:50, Delta 237.

Office Hours

Wed. 4 - 7, Thur. 1- 4,  or by appointment. If the suite door is locked, then call my extension (last 4 digits) using the phone in the hallway.

Teaching Assistant

Sandeep Gungu
Email: gangusandeepkumar@gmail.com
Office Hours: Mon. 6 - 10 PM, Tues 1 - 4, Wed  5 - 7 PM, Thurs. 11 - 4 PM

Course Description

An introduction to the design, implementation and use of relational database in solving problems and an introduction to general issues in database administration. Laboratory instruction.

The traditional undergraduate student load is 5 courses. Be prepared to commit 10 to 15 hours per week to this course!

Course Goals

 

By the end of the course, you will

  • Be able to perform simple, and intermediate level, SQL data retrieval operations

  • Be able to create an appropriate (normalized) conceptual data model for a small-scale transaction-processing database based upon sample documents and/or a userís description.

  • Use Entity-Relationship (ER) modeling elements to capture the fundamental design of a database in diagrammatic form

  • Be able to use SQL statements to create the structure of a database, control access to the database, and maintain the data in a database.

  • Learn introductory database administration, transaction management, concurrency control, and database security concepts and methods.

  • Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the fundamental concepts of database technology.

  • Evaluate the applications of database management systems, and to participate in the design of databases.

  • Describe the main issues of database administration and control.

  • Identify current trends of database management systems.

Prerequisites

One programming language course.  

Methodology

Lecture, case studies, and interactive problem solving. Laboratory Instruction

Appraisal:

 Homework  15% of the total

 Quizzes

   5% of the total
 Midterm:  40% of the total
 Final:  40% of the total

Grading:

    93+ = A; 90 = A-; 87+ = B+; 83+ = B; 80+ = B-;

      77+ = C+; 73+ = C; 70 = C-; 67+ = D+; 63+ = D; 60+ = D-; 0+= F

My motto:

Foster disciplined, altruistic passion.

Required Textbook  

 

Database Systems: Design, Implementation, and Management, by Coronel, 10th Edition. Cengage. ISBN 9781111969608

 

 

Normalization Resources

SQL Tutorials

ERD Resources

DBMS Software/Tools

Publications & Web Sites

Videos

 

Schedule

 

Jan 19 Course overview

 

          FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 1 of the textbook

  ∑   Turn in problems 1 through 5 on page 30 at the beginning of the next class. Make

      sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

 

Jan 26   File Systems and Databases: Background, History, DB systems

 

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

 ∑   Read: Chapter 2 of the textbook

 ∑   Turn in problems 1, 6 and 7 on page 59 at the beginning of the next class. Make

      sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

Feb 02DB Modeling Concepts: Entities, Attributes, Relationships,

                Business Rules. Overview of DB Models
                The Relational Database Model: Tables, Keys, Integrity Rules

 

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 3 of the textbook

  ∑   Turn in problems 1 through 9 on pages 98 and 99 at the beginning of the next class.

      Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

 

Feb 09 The Relational Database Model: Tables, keys, integrity  rules.

                Operators,  linking tables, data redundancy.   

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 4 of the textbook

  ∑   Turn in problems 1 and 3 on pages 143 and 144 at the beginning of the next class.

      Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred. 

Feb 16   ER Modeling: Entities, Relationships, Weak, Recursive, Composite,

                 Super and Sub Types

   

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 4 of the textbook

  ∑   Read: Chapter 5 of the textbook

  ∑   Read: Chapter 6 of the textbook

  ∑   Turn in case 9 on page 146 at the beginning of the next class.

      Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

  ∑   Turn in problem 4 on page 173 at the beginning of the next class.

      Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

 

Feb 23  ER Modeling: Developing an E-R Diagram, Functional Dependencies, Normalization

 

   FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 6 of the textbook

  ∑   Turn in problem 3A, 4A, and 6A pages 216 through 218 at the beginning of the

      next class. Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

 

Mar 01Normalization Continued and review

  

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑  Submit:  Midterm questions by Wednesday, March 7th, 7 PM.

  ∑   Study!

 

Mar 08 Midterm: Starts at 7 PM in Delta 237

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 7 of the textbook

 

------   March 15th - No Class - Spring Break -----------

 

Mar 22 SQL

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 8 of the textbook, Prepare for quiz next week

  ∑   Turn in problems 1 through 10 on pages 283 through 284 at the beginning of the

      next class. You may want to take screenshots of your results

    

Mar 29Advanced SQL

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 10 of the textbook, Prepare for quiz next week

   Turn in problems that are posted on the Yahoo Group

 

Apr  5 Transaction Mgmt and Concurrency control

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 12 of the textbook, Prepare for quiz next week

  ∑   Turn in problems 1 through 5 on page 464 at the beginning of the

      next class. Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

 

Apr 12 – Distributed Database Management Systems

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 13 of the textbook, Prepare for quiz next week

  ∑   Turn in problem 1 on pages 536 through 537 at the beginning of the

      next class. Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

 

Apr 19 Data Mining, Business Intelligence, and Data Warehouses

  FOR NEXT WEEK (IF NOT SOONER)  

  ∑   Read: Chapter 15 of the textbook, Prepare for quiz next week

  ∑   Turn in problem 1 on page 592 at the beginning of the

      next class. Make sure your answers are legible. MS Word is preferred.

  

* Last day to drop a class/withdraw for the semester is April 23rd *

 

Apr 26 Database Administration and Security
 
  

FOR NEXT CLASS (IF NOT SOONER)

  Submit:  Final questions by Wednesday, May 2nd, 7 PM.

  Study!

 

May  3 Final Exam: Closed Book, Closed Notes

 

 

 

Other Policies

Homework, Projects, Research Paper

  • Homework and projects are due exactly at the prescribed time (usually the beginning of class). As soon as a homework or project is collected, then all others are considered 1 day late (even if it only 3 minutes). In the event you might be running late, you might want to email the assignment. Also, when preparing your assignment, be mindful of possible backlogs at the printer, jammed printer, printer out of toner, etc.

  • Late homework/projects are accepted with a penalty of 10% deduction per 24-hour period after the due date. No late project will be accepted one week after the due date. The last homework/project cannot be late.

  • There will be no extra-credit homework or projects in this course.

  • All homework and projects must be typed not hand-written.

  • A cover page is expected for all homework and projects.

  • VERY IMPORTANT! In certain classes students are encouraged to work in groups. For this class you are expected to work on all homework and projects individually. Students may not discuss, use, email, show, give, buy, sell, borrow, trade, steal, etc. in whole or part, any of the homework or projects in any manner not prescribed by the instructor. Penalty for cheating will be extremely severe and may result in an F for this course. This condition applies even after you complete this course! Penalty for cheating will be extremely severe and may result in an F for this course. 

  • Handing in an assignment for another student is considered cheating. Penalty for cheating will be extremely severe and may result in an F for this course. 

  • VERY IMPORTANT! Failing to report to the instructor any incident in which a student witnesses an alleged violation of the Academic Honesty Code is considered a violation of the academic honesty code. Please see me to discuss any incidents.

  • VERY IMPORTANT! Purchasing, or otherwise acquiring and submitting as one's own work any research paper or any other writing assignment prepared by others constitutes cheating. Penalty for cheating will be extremely severe and may result in an F for this course.

  • VERY IMPORTANT! Plagiarism on either an abstract, draft of a paper, or final paper will result in a 0 for all three parts (abstract, draft version, final paper). Please review the following links regarding plagiarism very carefully: https://www.indiana.edu/~istd/definition.html

  • http://www.hamilton.edu/style/avoiding-plagiarism

  • http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources/how-not-to-plagiarize

  • Standard academic honesty procedure will be followed. For the UHCL Academic Honesty Policy, please click on the following link.

 

Tests and Quizzes

  • There are no make-up tests except in verified medical emergencies and with immediate notification. Rescheduling a final exam in order to catch a plane flight is unacceptable. Make up exams are harder, and different, than original exams.

  • There are no make-up quizzes. Allow plenty of additional time in the event that Blackboard crashes.

  • You are responsible for all required readings assigned throughout the semester.

  • Students are to work on test and quizzes individually.  Students may not discuss, show, give, sell, borrow, trade, share, etc. their tests or quizzes. Penalty on cheating will be extremely severe. Standard academic honesty procedure will be followed.

  • VERY IMPORTANT! Providing answers for any assigned work or examination when not specifically authorized by the instructor to do so. Or, informing any person or persons of the contents of any examination prior to the time the examination is given is considered cheating. Penalty for cheating will be extremely severe and may result in an F for this course.

  • VERY IMPORTANT! Failing to report to the instructor any incident in which a student witnesses an alleged violation of the Academic Honesty Code is considered a violation of the academic honesty code. Please see me to discuss any incidents.

Miscellaneous

  • Any person with a disability who requires a special accommodation should inform me and contact the Disability services office or call 281 283 2627 as soon as possible.

  • You are expected to come fully prepared to every class!

  • Incomplete grades or administrative withdrawals occur only under extremely rare situations.

  • The ringing, beeping, buzzing of cell phones, watches, and/or pagers during class time is extremely rude and disruptive to your fellow students and to the class flow. Please turn off all cell phones, watches, and pagers prior to the start of class.

  • There is no formal attendance policy. However, it is my experience that those students who do attend class on a regular basis do better on tests than those that don't.

  • I am willing to provide letters of recommendation/references only if you have attained an 'A' in one of my classes, or two 'A-' in two of my classes.

  • I highly recommend that you seek out your advisor and complete you Candidate Plan of Study (CPS) as soon as possible. I am normally not available for advising during the summer months.

  • Pay very careful attention to your email correspondence. It reflects on your communication skills. Below is a compilation of email errors I have received during the past year.

    dear sir.

    r u available to meet with to go over the homework bcoz i have a doubt about the third problem

    Some student

    Common problems:

       *   bcoz instead of because

       *   r instead of are

       *   u instead of you

       *   lowecase i instead of I

       *   starting a sentence with a lowercase letter

       *   doubt instead of question

     

  • I immediately discard anonymous emails.

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2700 Bay Area Boulevard
Delta Building. Office 171
Houston, Texas 77058
Voice: 281-283-3805
Fax: 281-283-3869
boetticher@uhcl.edu


© 2012 Boetticher: Database Management and Administration Course, All Rights Reserved.

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